iRead: (11) A Game Of Thrones.

Source: Goodreads.

I did not hate the book, however, I did also not love it. When I started formatting this review inside my head, I realized that I was trying too hard to like the novel.

_____

I haven’t read any Medieval fantasies before this one, but I do know what they’re all about, and George R. R. Martin hasn’t gotten out of the cliché zone of high fantasies. Dragons and zombies? Really?! :/

It could’ve been written way better. “A Game of Thrones” obviously portrays many “high lords” in dispute, that’s fine. But the historical background of the characters and settings were crammed in a dull, monotonous narrative. The author ignored the “common people”; I believe the story would’ve been much deeper and richer if he paid as much attention their cultures and how they lived.

There were points though, where I honestly loved the way he demonstrated and vividly painted the scenes. Sadly, he kept repeating himself, and at some point, I started noticing the abuse of adverbs and some adjectives. I have to admit that I felt attached at some parts to characters and engaged to the story, yet these were transient moments. Martin failed to keep me immersed.

Despite all the flaws, I would’ve been looking forward to the second book, if it wasn’t for misogyny and graphic scenes.

How often have words like “whores”, “wenches”, “sluts” been addressed to women? How many vulgar referrals to women’s body parts? And the undue descriptions, those I refrain from mentioning! This ugly reduction of women into mere tools of pleasure is sick. I did feel offended, and angry.

Now to the graphic content. Well, I’m totally against demonstrating intimate sexual details, I see no point of it whatsoever, and Martin writes like dirty-minded teenager, really. I always skip such paragraphs, but still, you don’t need to read to know they were very graphic, disgustingly graphic. I felt distressed (and threatened) so often throughout this book.

As an aspiring writer, I love to study popular works of fiction, and I did hope to learn anything there, but to my disappointment, there was nothing to learn.

 

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4 thoughts on “iRead: (11) A Game Of Thrones.

  1. If there’s nothing to be learned from such a popular series, I think the fault may be yours, not his.

    This is not to say that you’re wrong, but merely that you have not found the marrow of the story.

    Also, it is not to insist that you must sit around sucking bones all day — by all means proceed to something else!

  2. Hey, I wanted to let you know that although the first book was nearly exclusively written from the Lord and Lady’s point of view (and their children), eventually there are point of view chapters from more base-born characters.

    One of my all-time favorite character is introduced in the second book, A Clash of Kings. Although it sounds like you’re not interested in reading further.

    The later books feature very empowering arcs for undertrod characters, both male and female, some extremely surprising and emotional. I would encourage you to read more, but I certainly understand if it’s not the material you want to read.

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